Author Topic: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread  (Read 277576 times)

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Offline mart_haj1986

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #780 on: July 20, 2017, 03:22:08 PM »
Cheers Steven,

That put's my mind at rest a little :)

My traffic is very much stop/start at the beginning and end of my journeys and we have the big family Mazda 5 for the longer journeys, so mine is only ever really used for the shorter journeys.
I think I saw on another of your posts a while ago but cant remember, What tyres are you running?
Martin H - Nuneaton, Warwickshire UK

Offline StevenRB45

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #781 on: July 20, 2017, 04:41:57 PM »
Got a set of Goodyear efficientgrip performance. Tbf overall average probably has gone up by .5 mpg since I got them. But it's probably a little better than that as its dragging up a 2 year average.

Offline Engineer Andy

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #782 on: July 30, 2017, 11:16:21 AM »
Well after 3 years i'm getting 36-39 winter and 40-45 mpg summer in my 1.6 petrol. Average overall measured tank to tank is 40.3mpg. Most it's ever done on one tank is 421 miles bit usually it's more like 360 to the 380.

Be interesting to see if it goes up at the end of the month, given it's got it's year 6 service so the factory spark plugs will be renewed along with the 3 year old air filter and new oil.

I get about the same (average about 1mpg higher at around 41.5mpg brim-to-brim method - mine being a saloon may make a marginal difference compared to an equivalent hatchback version) in my 1.6 petrol - interesting that you use super unleaded - have you noticed any difference in mpg and/or performance whilst using it?  I wasn't sure whether the standard older models (i.e. not the MPS) would benefit from it other than perhaps lower emissions (cleaner burning of the fuel) and cleaning the inside of the engine (say using Shell and other 'brand' fuels that have cleaning additives, as opposed to supermarket fuels which don't).

For me, it was difficult to know how much of a difference (other than the engine sounding a bit quieter/smoother) the big 6th year service made, as my mileage varies per year quite a lot due to changes in jobs/workplaces (difficult to compare).

Offline StevenRB45

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #783 on: July 30, 2017, 12:47:43 PM »
I don't have any numbers on this car I've always run it v power, my previous 1.5 Suzuki improved by about 2.5 to 5% when I switched over. Willpower does have numbers on his that improve/get worse when he changes between the 2.

In all honesty I wouldn't hand on heart say it makes much of a difference but given the difference in cost is about 2 quid a week it's not breaking the bank. If I ever find myself short of 2 quid a week...then I'd probably switch the a.c. off instead.

Got it back from the year 6 on Friday seems to be running very nice indeed, shall see if it gets any better.

Offline Engineer Andy

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #784 on: August 06, 2017, 03:28:33 PM »
I don't have any numbers on this car I've always run it v power, my previous 1.5 Suzuki improved by about 2.5 to 5% when I switched over. Willpower does have numbers on his that improve/get worse when he changes between the 2.

In all honesty I wouldn't hand on heart say it makes much of a difference but given the difference in cost is about 2 quid a week it's not breaking the bank. If I ever find myself short of 2 quid a week...then I'd probably switch the a.c. off instead.

Got it back from the year 6 on Friday seems to be running very nice indeed, shall see if it gets any better.

Gave my car an 'Italian tune up' yesterday and have bought some Redex fuel injector cleaner additive (4-dose bottle) to use over the next month or so.  I'm also thinking of using Shell SuperUnleaded as well, especially as I haven't being doing much driving for the past few months (gave up my job/thinking about a career change, so no commute and only a 25 mile round trip once a fortnight to keep the car battery and running gear going ok), but will be going down to the West Country on holiday soon, which should give my car a very nice workout and put up to 1000 miles on the clock over the fortnight, equal to about 2-3 fillups of fuel.  On the same trips before I've managed to get 45mpg+ out of the car, so I'll see what difference both the additive and using (where possible) Shell SU (with its extra additives) over the period.

Obviously there may be variations due to where I might drive to whilst I'm there and road conditions (day/night driving, weather, traffic, etc), but it'll be interesting to see what (if any) difference they make on an older standard car (i.e. not a turbocharged MPS or more modern direct-injection engine with a knock sensor) which has been well-maintained.  The Redex may not make much of a difference in max. power available, but from looking up tests done by many (see YouTube), they can help make power delivery smoother over the rev range of each gear, perhaps helping older performance cars regain some 'lost' power.  I'll let you guys know how I get on around the middle of September.

Offline Willpower

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #785 on: January 14, 2018, 09:45:21 AM »
I was chatting with the sales staff in my local dealer on Friday and allegedly there are plans for world wide legislation to make manufacturers actually do real life mpg readings. Exactly what is involved I can't say, or what body would be overseeing the results. But it would mean testing a car as it would be driven on the road. Not stripped down on a carefully prepared track. 

That would prove interesting
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Offline zoomzoomer

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #786 on: January 14, 2018, 12:26:33 PM »
Good to hear, common sense at last. I am more than happy with my new cars mpg of 36 in winter and that's with a lot of stop start driving.

Offline StevenRB45

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #787 on: February 23, 2018, 02:12:55 PM »
For the first time since getting the car I've had to fill it on 95 octane supermarket. Gotta say fuel economy on my gentle roll to work is so far the same however it currently feels like driving 3 up. Mid range torque appears to have disappeared and it feels rather lazy.

I was always of the opinion it was quite a nippy car for the power it had...on Morrison's 95 it's a slow car. No running issues obviously just rather flat.

Offline red_imps_2003

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #788 on: February 27, 2018, 04:13:15 PM »
I've been monitoring my 1.6 d TS2 (59 plate) using brim-to-brim for 15 months now (recording using the 'Fuelio' app). The average over that time is 50.6mpg - not far of the figure reported in the Honest John real mpg page (49.5). It has been fairly typical to see 48 - 50 over the coldest months and 51 - 52 over the warmest ones. The average is probably raised very slightly by the odd long journey I have done on motorways and steady A-roads, where the MPG at re-fill was typically mid fifties. The highest I have recorded over a full tank was 57.89. I've varied a lot between supermarket stuff and BP/Shell premium diesels with no obvious correlation with changes in mpg at the next re-fill. That said, I don't think I've filled up with premium fuels consecutively enough times to have minimised contamination from the previous cheap stuff. I'm not attuned with my car enough  to tell whether there has been any variation in 'performance' (engine note, lumpiness, responsiveness). There was a period where it seemed to hesitate upon first leaving the house in the morning but I don't think it coincided with any particular fuel.

I've also tried a number of other changes over that time too, so it would be impossible to attribute any changes, perceived or otherwise, directly to fuel anyhow. I had a generic remap four months in, a terraclean three months after that, used Redex, Millers Ecomax, ZX1 Extralube, and two-stroke engine oil in the fuel tank, as well as ZX1 Extralube in the oil. None of which made any perceptible difference either to the fuel economy or the general running (except the remap, which has improved acceleration in the mid range and higher up quite noticeably). I also put a bottle of Wynn's DPF cleaner in the fuel tank three weeks back and the only perceptible effect of that was a complete shutdown twice in quick succession as I accelerated hard off a roundabout on the way in to work a couple of days later. Dunno what that was about but it hasn't happened again since, thankfully.

Of course, none of this provides any indication what differences are happening on the insides in terms of gunk build-up and wear-and-tear.
« Last Edit: March 07, 2018, 01:39:08 PM by red_imps_2003 »
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Offline Engineer Andy

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #789 on: March 05, 2018, 04:37:41 PM »
I've been monitoring my 1.6 d TS2 (59 plate) using brim-to-brim for 15 months now (recording using the 'Fulio' app). The average over that time is 50.6mpg - not far of the figure reported in the Honest John real mpg page (49.5). It has been fairly typical to see 48 - 50 over the coldest months and 51 - 52 over the warmest ones. The average is probably raised very slightly by the odd long journey I have done on motorways and steady A-roads, where the MPG at re-fill was typically mid fifties. The highest I have recorded over a full tank was 57.89. I've varied a lot between supermarket stuff and BP/Shell premium diesels with no obvious correlation with changes in mpg at the next re-fill. That said, I don't think I've filled up with premium fuels consecutively enough times to have minimised contamination from the previous cheap stuff. I'm not attuned with my car enough  to tell whether there has been any variation in 'performance' (engine note, lumpiness, responsiveness). There was a period where it seemed to hesitate upon first leaving the house in the morning but I don't think it coincided with any particular fuel.

I've also tried a number of other changes over that time too, so it would be impossible to attribute any changes, perceived or otherwise, directly to fuel anyhow. I had a generic remap four months in, a terraclean three months after that, used Redex, Millers Ecomax, ZX1 Extralube, and two-stroke engine oil in the fuel tank, as well as ZX1 Extralube in the oil. None of which made any perceptible difference either to the fuel economy or the general running (except the remap, which has improved acceleration in the mid range and higher up quite noticeably). I also put a bottle of Wynn's DPF cleaner in the fuel tank three weeks back and the only perceptible effect of that was a complete shutdown twice in quick succession as I accelerated hard off a roundabout on the way in to work a couple of days later. Dunno what that was about but it hasn't happened again since, thankfully.

Of course, none of this provides any indication what differences are happening on the insides in terms of gunk build-up and wear-and-tear.

Don't forget that the two grades of diesel available at the pumps are the same in terms of cetane rating (equivalent of octane rating for petrol), unlike petrol, where the octane rating for 'super' fuels is higher (97/98/99 Ron), however both 'super' diesel and petrol have increased levels of detergents in them, more so generally in the higher-priced branded filling stations, which help remove gunk in engines that haven't been cared for so well or that mainly do short journeys/urban work that the engines don't like and promotes them gunking up.  Your car may be in good nick, so all any fuel is doing (assuming its well cared for and does a reasonable amount of extra-urban work regularly), or equivalent shop-bought additives, is keeping the engine and injectors clean.

Offline StevenRB45

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #790 on: March 12, 2018, 04:24:21 PM »
Well mysteriously the one tank of 95 I've ever run in this car is also the worst mpg I've ever got out of the car. So 36.8..I've never been below 37 (checked back through fuelly) in 28k I've had the car.

Also the first time the trip computer has been optimistic as well, normally I get about .5 mpg better brim to brim than it says this time it was .5 worse than it said.

Yes winter will be having an effect..but it's 3 years of data including 3 winters.
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 04:32:15 PM by StevenRB45 »

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #791 on: March 20, 2018, 02:03:13 PM »
Well mysteriously the one tank of 95 I've ever run in this car is also the worst mpg I've ever got out of the car. So 36.8..I've never been below 37 (checked back through fuelly) in 28k I've had the car.

Also the first time the trip computer has been optimistic as well, normally I get about .5 mpg better brim to brim than it says this time it was .5 worse than it said.

Yes winter will be having an effect..but it's 3 years of data including 3 winters.

That seems about right and agrees with what I've found my 1.6p can get on 95RON in cold, bad weather and heavy traffic to work (35.5 - 36mpg at about this time last year going to work - worst conditions in all respects I've come across [mine normally does an average of 37mpg in the dead of winter).  On superunleaded, mine's currently averaging about 38.5mpg though not on quite so much traffic (similar weather).

I'm also wondering if it makes any difference which filling station and pump you choose, as well as the day/time, e.g. just after the tanker delivers the fuel, or the last drop-off for them, plus the pump that takes from a corner of the underground tanks....?

Whilst most filling stations are well used, so fuel doesn't sit around for ages like it can do in car tanks, I'm wondering if the big underground tanks suffer from poor mixing, especially in the corners, where old fuel may linger and thus give poorer performance if you take fuel from a pump that uses that area of the tank.  I know this is a problem with water tanks and is often the cause of bacteria growth if the inlet and outlet pipes are not on opposite sides as well as top and low level respectively.  Just a guess as regards fuels though.

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #792 on: March 20, 2018, 08:52:11 PM »
Well mysteriously the one tank of 95 I've ever run in this car is also the worst mpg I've ever got out of the car. So 36.8..I've never been below 37 (checked back through fuelly) in 28k I've had the car.

Also the first time the trip computer has been optimistic as well, normally I get about .5 mpg better brim to brim than it says this time it was .5 worse than it said.

Yes winter will be having an effect..but it's 3 years of data including 3 winters.

That seems about right and agrees with what I've found my 1.6p can get on 95RON in cold, bad weather and heavy traffic to work (35.5 - 36mpg at about this time last year going to work - worst conditions in all respects I've come across [mine normally does an average of 37mpg in the dead of winter).  On superunleaded, mine's currently averaging about 38.5mpg though not on quite so much traffic (similar weather).

I'm also wondering if it makes any difference which filling station and pump you choose, as well as the day/time, e.g. just after the tanker delivers the fuel, or the last drop-off for them, plus the pump that takes from a corner of the underground tanks....?

Whilst most filling stations are well used, so fuel doesn't sit around for ages like it can do in car tanks, I'm wondering if the big underground tanks suffer from poor mixing, especially in the corners, where old fuel may linger and thus give poorer performance if you take fuel from a pump that uses that area of the tank.  I know this is a problem with water tanks and is often the cause of bacteria growth if the inlet and outlet pipes are not on opposite sides as well as top and low level respectively.  Just a guess as regards fuels though.

I read once that you should buy fuel when the temperature is at its lowest as it expands with heat. So first thing in the morning when it has had time to cool all night is probably best. Conversely 9 or 10 pm is probably the worst time. Maybe there is some truth in this
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Offline Engineer Andy

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #793 on: March 23, 2018, 06:15:37 PM »
Well mysteriously the one tank of 95 I've ever run in this car is also the worst mpg I've ever got out of the car. So 36.8..I've never been below 37 (checked back through fuelly) in 28k I've had the car.

Also the first time the trip computer has been optimistic as well, normally I get about .5 mpg better brim to brim than it says this time it was .5 worse than it said.

Yes winter will be having an effect..but it's 3 years of data including 3 winters.

That seems about right and agrees with what I've found my 1.6p can get on 95RON in cold, bad weather and heavy traffic to work (35.5 - 36mpg at about this time last year going to work - worst conditions in all respects I've come across [mine normally does an average of 37mpg in the dead of winter).  On superunleaded, mine's currently averaging about 38.5mpg though not on quite so much traffic (similar weather).

I'm also wondering if it makes any difference which filling station and pump you choose, as well as the day/time, e.g. just after the tanker delivers the fuel, or the last drop-off for them, plus the pump that takes from a corner of the underground tanks....?

Whilst most filling stations are well used, so fuel doesn't sit around for ages like it can do in car tanks, I'm wondering if the big underground tanks suffer from poor mixing, especially in the corners, where old fuel may linger and thus give poorer performance if you take fuel from a pump that uses that area of the tank.  I know this is a problem with water tanks and is often the cause of bacteria growth if the inlet and outlet pipes are not on opposite sides as well as top and low level respectively.  Just a guess as regards fuels though.

I read once that you should buy fuel when the temperature is at its lowest as it expands with heat. So first thing in the morning when it has had time to cool all night is probably best. Conversely 9 or 10 pm is probably the worst time. Maybe there is some truth in this

I did read something similar that you should always buy petrol when its coldest outside, though more to do with less evaporating off the nozzle and fuel pipe as you actually fill it, as petrol can vapourise quite easily at daytime temperatures compare to colder nighttime temperatures.  I suspect that the density will vary in the underground tanks to a degree as well, though not as much as you think - the temperature of the ground is relatively constant throughout the year after going down over a meter or two, which is why ground source heat pump systems to provide heating to buildings often have their heat 'source' pipes at that depth.

Offline StevenRB45

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #794 on: March 23, 2018, 11:41:43 PM »
I'd read it was a simple as pumps measure volume not quantity as such. Hot fuel = more volume and less for your money, cold fuel more dense and more for your money.

However it's a going beyond the far end of a fart to test that for me... ;)

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Re: The Mazda 3 Fuel Economy Thread
« Reply #794 on: March 23, 2018, 11:41:43 PM »