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Actually, I think I figured it out, the satnav ISN'T getting a GPS signal. Despite it "tracking" where I am... (I think the software knows my location and uses the internal software rather than GPS position to work out where I'm moving).

So I guess next question I'll go searching for is how to replace/repair the GPS receiver.
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Vehicle Entertainment / Navigation Systems / Really poor sounding stereo.
« Last post by Ste7en on Yesterday at 10:04:21 PM »
Our Mazda 3 2.0 SE NAV Fastback has one of the worst sounding car stereo systems I have ever heard.

It sounds like it is mono and coming from somewhere behind the centre console, you have to really crank it up to hear it as well.

Doesn't appear to be a Bose system as there is no badging.

Thinking about treating it to new speakers when we get it back.

Any recommendations regarding this route? I really just want a quick, easy fix that won't cost a fortune.
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Wheels/Tyres / Re: Spare wheel, Mazda 3 2014 +
« Last post by Kentish on Yesterday at 09:10:10 PM »
I can get my golf clubs and electric trolley in my HB boot without the parcel shelf moving very much, and thats with the spare in.
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Wheels/Tyres / Re: Spare wheel, Mazda 3 2014 +
« Last post by Engineer Andy on Yesterday at 02:45:00 PM »
Thanks for the info on the boot space issue - its telling that Mazda don't say anything about this in their blurb, including on the website.  The reduction in height of the boot interior could make it far less useable when loading it with suitcases etc, and overall it may be a LOT smaller (419ltrs without the spare for the Fastback) than my mk1 saloon (430 ltrs) with the spare fitted.  The gen3 is lower than the two previous models, so it could be they've made it shallower.

When I test drove the Fastback about 18 months ago, I noted that the boot opening was even smaller (height wise) than my mk1 saloon's as well.  This could make loading very tricky for some items.  I think Mazda have made a really bad decision on this score - not fitting any spare as standard, charging way too much for the kit and doing so reduces the boot height by 2 inches/5cm.  That might make it too small for my requirements (to fit all my holiday stuff [golf bag and trolley included] in the boot without needing to put the back seats down [security on the journey at service stops] and safety if I has an accident).  I may as well (if it doesn't fit) get a CX-3 SE-L Nav (the Sport model has the upgraded ICE in the spare wheel well and thus CANNOT take a spare without it being loose in the boot [great design there Mazda!]) which is smaller and easier to park.
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Wheels/Tyres / Re: Spare wheel, Mazda 3 2014 +
« Last post by Kentish on August 19, 2018, 08:46:48 PM »
The boot space is reduced with a space saving spare wheel in it, as I found when I put one in my 2017 Sport Nav.
Ive also got a  RoadHero spare wheel kit going cheap that having bought I decided I didnt want.
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Wheels/Tyres / Re: Spare wheel, Mazda 3 2014 +
« Last post by hanix on August 19, 2018, 03:50:33 PM »
The official spare wheel kit raises the floor about 2". I obtained mine from the vehicle supplier for £290.00,so I think the price varies according to the circumstances of the initial purchase of the vehicle.
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Vehicle Electrics / Re: Dead as a dodo
« Last post by Engineer Andy on August 19, 2018, 12:55:51 PM »
Looking at Mazdas own bumf if you buy a battery from them as a replacement part it has a 36k mile or 3 year warranty...it would be very odd indeed if the oem one didn't have the same warranty.

Seems to have died very prematurely..have you checked you don't have any drain on It?

I suspect the warranty is conditional on the car being used regularly for reasonable length driving so the battery gets topped back up to 100%.  Note that even if there are no electrical faults (e.g. boot light or similar) drawing current when they shouldn't, the alarm/immobiliser, clock and the ECU must all draw some current whilst the car is switched off to work/keep information in memory to be used the next time the car is used.

When I've been out of work (as I am now [mulling over a career change]), I don't need to use my car much (i.e. no weekday commuting) and found in previous years this lead to the car's battery failing only after 4 years or so.  By experimentation, I found that I needed to use it on a reasonable run (12-13 miles each way to the nearby town for shopping on a dual carriageway) once every 3 weeks in the summer, every 2 weeks in cooler spring/autumn and once a week in winter.  That works out at roughly 650 miles and about £100 of fuel more per year.  I think my battery would probably not make it to 3 years had I not used it at all - I don't know if that would be covered by its warranty if I barely used the car and let it go flat far quicker.

The extra expense of driving it 650 more miles pa (£400 over 4 years compared to a replacement battery every 2 at £150) £100 more, would be less of an issue than a flat battery and having to call out the RAC or a neighbour to recharge the battery (and again on the way back) for an important journey, e.g. going on holiday or to a family event.  Using the car a bit more often also keeps the mechanicals in better nick, especially the brakes which have a bad habit of binding if the car sits around for long, especially in cooler, damp conditions.  Repairing/replacing those would cost a lot and easily justify the extra fuel.
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Wheels/Tyres / Re: Spare wheel, Mazda 3 2014 +
« Last post by Engineer Andy on August 19, 2018, 12:38:08 PM »
I bought a spacesaver and kit from e.bay £129 brand new so pleased with that, but I thought I would cut down the existing moulding now I am not inclined to hack away at it and are even wondering whether to keep both and just have the wheel in the boot, under certain conditions the foam and pump might be better? what does everyone think? my car is a 2016 2.0 se f/b

In my view, the 'tube of goo' is a complete waste of time, as they a) cannot always seal a hole - obviously not larger ones or those in the sidewall, and b) once you've been 'lucky' that the sealant worked on the tread part of the tyre, using it renders the tyre unrepairable, so you have to purchase a new tyre anyway, if there's a tyre fitter within the locale open (not the case on Sundays, Bank holidays and in the evening) - you can't just keep driving on it (e.g. for the rest of your 200 mile holiday drive) as some idiots seem to think, similarly with space savers (why they are limited to 50mph AND often 50 miles).

I would score them in terms of usefulness:
Tube of goo - 2/10;
Space-saver spare - 6/10;
Full Size spare - 8/10.

I only give the full sized spare 8/10 as technically they should be an non-directional tyre, as fitting a directional one on the wrong side can, in poor weather, lead to a noticeable difference in grip levels.  I was lucky on my old (1996) Nissan Micra that the OEM spare wheel (all steel) and tyre was both identical to the other four fitted and were symmetric tyres; when I changed the set of four I went for a directional tyre, but I could keep the spare as it could be fitted to any corner without as much penalty on grip/handling as a directional spare fitted the wrong way around.

If I was given the option (including paying a reasonable amount extra, but not like the £395 Mazda charges for a space saver kit) to have a full size spare wheel (even if it were a steel one) and tyre, then I'd go for it.  Unfortunately very few new cars come with this setup or as an option, and it looks like the trend towards removing spares altogether (even having no underboot internal stowage area for one of any kind) is growing.  A poor choice in my book (especially from Mazda - note that Volvo charge about £100 for the same sort of kit, some VAG and Kia/Hyundais are equipped with full sized spares as STANDARD), especially as the saving in weight (i.e. increase in mpg/reduction in CO2) probably doesn't make that much of a difference, especially when the costs of extra repairs (including callouts of the RAC & Co)/new tyres due to use of the tube of goo are factored in.

On another forum, a VAG fan said he looked at a gen 3 Mazda3 and noted that putting the spare (the Mazda fitted one with its kit) in the underboot area made the boot floor bulge above it, making the main boot space less useful (not flat) or you had to raise it, thus making the actual usable space measurably less than the stated capacity.  Can anyone with a gen 3 car verify this - this certainly isn't that case with my gen 1 car.
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Accessories / Re: Dashcam fitting, do they have to be on the windscreen?
« Last post by Ste7en on August 18, 2018, 12:18:00 PM »
It depends, if it's 2 seperate units it can be in different places but if it's say a nextbase Duo where it has two lenses on one unit then it needs line of sight both directions from where it is.

You must be local to me then, I commute along Scotswood road most days!

Pretty sure the Thinkware F770 is two units.

Well. I'm in Durham but I do go to Newcastle a lot :) I've had stuff done to other cars by the guys in Autosounds and they have always been excellent.
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Accessories / Re: Dashcam fitting, do they have to be on the windscreen?
« Last post by StevenRB45 on August 18, 2018, 11:46:21 AM »
Good idea regarding the mobile recording.

The one I was thinking of was the Thinkware F770, probably from Autosounds in Newcastle (and get them to install it).

I wasn't aware front and rear ones had to be fitted on the windscreen. Thanks!

It depends, if it's 2 seperate units it can be in different places but if it's say a nextbase Duo where it has two lenses on one unit then it needs line of sight both directions from where it is.

You must be local to me then, I commute along Scotswood road most days!
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